Spaced-Out Sanctuaries: the Ritual Landscape of Roman Greece

Abstract

Effects of the Roman conquest of Greece have been little studied, in favour of emphasising the ‘reverse imperialism’ of Greece’s cultural conquest of Rome. Such a perspective masks the undoubted impact felt throughout Greek society at the time of its incorporation and assimilation into a wider imperial system. This paper examines the Greek response to their altered political and economic state through the evidence of ritual geography, specifically changes in the location and ditribution of cult places in the landscape. Several patterns are discerned, each of which reveals in its own way the redistribution of social power in Greece under Roman rule.

How to Cite

Alcock S., (1993) “Spaced-Out Sanctuaries: the Ritual Landscape of Roman Greece”, Theoretical Roman Archaeology Journal 0(1991), p.155-165. doi: https://doi.org/10.16995/TRAC1991_155_165

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Susan Alcock ( )

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